Pacifica Housing offers crucial support for recovering sex assault victims

Mother of three credits Pacifica Housing for its support as she and others recover from lives as sexual assault victims

With tears in my eyes I walked into Pacifica and said, “Please, I’m in a transition house with my two daughters, I am in court, and I need a place to live.”  I was dealing with a historical sexual assault; I lost my virginity between the ages of 4 and 5.

I was not able to balance trauma, healing and job performance. I lost my job, my home and eventually my family fell apart. I essentially found myself broke and homeless with two children praying to a God I never knew.

Pacifica explained to me, “Subsidized housing is one step up from being off the street,” and homes were given to the highest in need. Although Pacifica had homes that permitted dogs, none of those homes were available. My little dog Angel was the last to go and it was not easy. I had to accept the hard facts, “I’m not in a mental state where I could give her the love that she needed, but I found a home that could.”

My priority was to keep me and my children together, heal from trauma, get educated, and finish the ugly court case; for a single mom with a Grade 9 education, that was more than enough responsibilities.

Pacifica gave me a clean three-bedroom townhouse for $208 per a month. My little girls could safely play outside and the children from the complex regularly come to visit.

There is never less than 10 children that play together in this complex. They don’t have fancy toys, but they have each other. You see, we may live in poverty, but we are far from poor.

With the exception of a two-parent family, we are 18 units comprised of mostly single women with children. Sure, at times it’s not so jolly, but our doors are never locked and tea is always brewing.

Once a year, Pacifica pays for camp Thunderbird. They supply a school bus and kids are given a lunch. In addition, every Tuesday Pacifica sends a community leader to hold a kids club. Pacifica also pays and arranges community skating events and fun farm trips for the families.

We have community garage sales, we go to the beach together, and we take our kids swimming.

We know when a child is sick and we definitely know when our children are fighting. Yet, at the end of a long day, I come home to my little girls running towards me to give me a hug, they truly are my angels.

I enrolled at the University of Victoria and I was able to receive immediate psychotherapy through campus health services. Dr. Cooper, a campus psychiatrist, literally reconstructed my mind. I went through intense psychotherapy treatments while attending part time classes.

Dr. Karen Brown, a philosophy professor at UVic, teaches moral ethic, and was my professor for many classes. She was patient and compassionate while I struggled though the theories. I attended almost all of her ethical classes. I shared them with my friends in Jolly Place. We love learning, we just never got a chance.

I now major in philosophy, and I am a law student at ALU. I am still in court and fighting my own trial. My appeal is on Sept. 27, 2016. In any event, my story is nothing short of a miracle and Pacifica was an essential factor.

In addition to this, I have met other rape victims at Jolly Place, amongst the ones are ‘K’ and ‘J’.

K is excited and saddened because she wants to go to university. She has obstacles that she needs to cross and that requires the help of the community. Pacifica houses her and takes care of her.

The other is ‘J’, also a victim of sexual assault. She has been making future plans of becoming a veterinary assistant.  As a victim of sexual assault, healing while in school means facing the darkest demons in one’s closet. If I had to do it again, I don’t know if I could.

These women are up against a fight for their life. They stood up and walked away from abuse.

When a woman is inviting her abuser into her home, the issue becomes too big for Pacifica. Tenants, such as myself, are left in a terrible position to call 911 when screams are heard. After I call, her abuser starts to become angry with me.

We all rely on Pacifica to keep the community safe and keep the violence out. Its not an easy job. I guess what I am trying to say is, “Thank you Pacifica, you changed my life.”

AnonymousSaanich

 

 

Just Posted

An example of the forest land in the Port Renfrew and Fairy Creek area of Vancouver Island is shown on May 11, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jen Osborne
Old-growth logging opponents launch hunger strike as arrests continue at Fairy Creek

Zain Haq says the hunger strikers will gather today at Burrard Street in downtown Vancouver

The City of Victoria is hoping to ring in the summer by celebrating local art and offering some distanced, live music to surprise people in parks, plazas and other public spaces. (Photo courtesy of the City of Victoria)
Live, pop-up concerts and local art being showcased in Victoria this summer

People will see surprise serenades at 16 locations throughout the summer

An example of the forest land in the Port Renfrew and Fairy Creek area of Vancouver Island is shown on May 11, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jen Osborne
Old-growth logging opponents launch hunger strike as arrests continue at Fairy Creek

Zain Haq says the hunger strikers will gather today at Burrard Street in downtown Vancouver

Jada Benwell and Connor Larkey are the valedictorians of the 2021 graduating class at Parkland Secondary School. (Wolf Depner/News Staff)
Pandemic taught lessons in perseverance for North Saanich high schoolers

Parkland Secondary School to release 2021 grad ceremony video on June 25

The 14th annual Oak Bay Young Exceptional Star (YES) awards June 3. (Christine van Reeuwyk/News Staff)
Oak Bay celebrates its Young Exceptional Stars with outdoor award ceremony

Nine young people recognized in 14th annual awards

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau participates in a plenary session at the G7 Summit in Carbis Bay, England on Friday June 11, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Canada donating 13M surplus COVID-19 vaccine doses to poor countries

Trudeau says the government will pay for 87 million shots to be distributed to poor countries

Premier John Horgan speaks as provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry, right, and health minister Adrian Dix look on during a press conference to update on the province’s fall pandemic preparedness plan during a press conference from the press theatre at Legislature in Victoria, Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
B.C. officials to provide details on Step 2 of COVID reopening plan Monday

Step 2 could allow for larger gatherings and a resumption of recreational travel

Indigenous Services Minister Marc Miller is seen during a news conference, Wednesday May 19, 2021 in Ottawa. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Indigenous child-welfare battle heads to court despite calls for Ottawa to drop cases

Feds are poised to argue against two Canadian Human Rights Tribunal rulings

The Great Ogopogo Bathtub Race has been held in Summerland as a fundraising event. Do you know which Canadian city introduced this sport? (Black Press file photo)
QUIZ: A summer’s day at the water

How much do you know about boats, lakes and water?

Two-year-old Ivy McLeod laughs while playing with Lucky the puppy outside their Chilliwack home on Thursday, June 10, 2021. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress)
VIDEO: B.C. family finds ‘perfect’ puppy with limb difference for 2-year-old Ivy

Ivy has special bond with Lucky the puppy who was also born with limb difference

A million-dollar ticket was sold to an individual in Vernon from the Lotto Max draw Friday, June 11, 2021. (Photo courtesy of BCLC)
Lottery ticket worth $1 million sold in Vernon

One lucky individual holds one of 20 tickets worth $1 million from Friday’s Lotto Max draw

“65 years, I’ve carried the stories in my mind and live it every day,” says Jack Kruger. (Athena Bonneau)
‘Maybe this time they will listen’: Survivor shares stories from B.C. residential school

Jack Kruger, living in Syilx territory, wasn’t surprised by news of 215 children’s remains found on the grounds of the former Kamloops Indian Residential School

A logging truck carries its load down the Elaho Valley near in Squamish, B.C. in this file photo. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chuck Stoody
Squamish Nation calls for old-growth logging moratorium in its territory

The nation says 44% of old-growth forests in its 6,900-square kilometre territory are protected while the rest remain at risk

Most Read