Plant invaders need pruning

Re: Scotch broom, I’ve got your back (Charla Huber, May 13)

Charla Huber suggests, that since humans are invaders, this is a justification for allowing plant invaders.

Humans have been altering the landscape of southern Vancouver Island for thousands of years. First Nations created and burned open areas every fall to produce larger crops of camas and other edible plants, as well as improving the habitat for elk and deer.

Broom does kill native plants such as camas by cutting out the light.

Beacon Hill Park would be a bleaker place today if it were not for the parks staff pulling the broom up by the roots and allowing for the existence of the beautiful fields of blue camas.

Most environments on the south end of the Island are the product of human interaction. Protecting the diversity of species and a diversity of habitats is important even if they are mostly the product of human intervention.

Those who favour broom would not likely have the same attitude to the related gorse with its large and nasty spikes.

Grant Keddie

Victoria