Safety rep’s statements refuted by U.S. research

Flashing lights shown to make a difference at U.S. crosswalks

Re: Spike in pedestrian-driver collisions prompts warnings (News, Dec. 12)

I question Alan Perry’s statements regarding crosswalks with flashing lights doing “little to decrease pedestrian crashes.” I requested the background research from Mr. Perry and, so far, he has been unable to fulfill my request.

In January 2012, the Federal Highway Administration in the United States released a memorandum, in which they listed nine research-proven countermeasures that have the greatest effect on improving road safety.

Two of these measures were flashing lights at crosswalks and pedestrian crossing islands.

Mr. Perry’s statement suggesting that crosswalks can give pedestrians a false sense of safety is not backed up by solid research.

According to the U.S. study, a high-intensity activated crosswalk has shown to reduce pedestrian-related crashes by up to 69 per cent and roadway crashes by up to 29 per cent.

This kind of crosswalk displays a flashing orange light, followed by a red light indicating that traffic should come to a full halt. Pedestrian islands mid-road resulted in a 46-per-cent drop in pedestrian crashes.

As Victoria roads become more congested, I would rather see an increase in safety infrastructure than a culture of blaming the pedestrian.

We are all pedestrians. Drivers, on the other hand, need to hold a licence.

Drivers are responsible for slowing down and scanning intersections and pedestrian crossings with great attention. Traffic safety campaigns for pedestrians are important, but it is simply a fact of life that pedestrians will make mistakes.

We can avoid some tragic results if drivers watch out and cities put in place research-proven safety measures.

Brenda MacKinley

Saanich

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Improperly transporting a pet in the back of the truck can cost up to $368

Police recommend keeping all animals inside the passenger portion of the vehicle

Mass-timber project in Esquimalt switches from condos to rentals

Corvette Landing will now offer rental units in the area

Police incident in Mount Douglas Park leads to road closure

Officers turning cars away, letting hikers go up trails

PHOTOS: Women’s March through downtown Victoria draws crowds of activists, allies

Attendees of all ages carried instruments, posters with empowering messages

‘Like an ATM’: World’s first biometric opioid-dispensing machine launches in B.C.

First-of-its-kind dispensing machine unveiled in the Downtown Eastside with hopes of curbing overdose deaths

Canucks extend home win streak to 8 with 4-1 triumph over Sharks

Victory lifts Vancouver into top spot in NHL’s Pacific Division

BC Green Party leader visits northern B.C. pipeline protest site

Adam Olsen calls for better relationship between Canada, British Columbia and First Nations

‘Extensive’ work planned at Big Bar landslide ahead of salmon, steelhead migration

Fisheries Minister Bernadette Jordan visited the site of the slide from June

B.C. society calls out conservation officer after dropping off bear cub covered in ice

Ice can be seen in video matted into emaciated bear cub’s fur

Royal deal clears way for Harry, Meghan part-time Canada move: experts

Keith Roy of the Monarchist League of Canada said the deal is exactly what Harry and Meghan asked for

Horgan cancels event in northern B.C. due to security concerns, says Fraser Lake mayor

The premier will still be visiting the city, but the location and day will not be made public

PHOTOS: Eastern Newfoundland reeling, search underway for missing man after blizzard

More than 70 centimetres of new snow fell overnight, creating whiteout conditions

Prince Harry, Meghan to give up ‘royal highness’ titles

‘Harry, Meghan and Archie will always be much loved members of my family,’ says Queen Elizabeth II

Most Read